Entries by Nichole Basile

Easter 4 – May 7, 2017 – Kate Davis

If you’ve spent much time churches, you might (like me) have a little bit of baggage with scripture in general, and shepherd imagery in particular. I think we like to use shepherding stories for children. They’re so … pastoral. So tame. Sheep are so soft and cuddly and kid-friendly. My childhood lessons of the gospel […]

Cleopas and his companion, who was a fellow disciple, perhaps a woman, maybe even his wife, were discouraged, anxious and certainly confused. It was Sunday evening, just a few days since the death of Jesus. The shock and horror of his crucifixion was still very powerfully in their minds. It was the image they imagined […]

Easter 2 – April 23, 2017 – Kate Davis

Today, we begin Week 2 of Easter, but in our gospel text today, the disciples are still on first Easter Sunday, the day of the Resurrection. Earlier in the day, Mary went to the tomb and wept. She spoke with angels, embraced her Rabbi, and preached the first post-resurrection sermon to the disciples, saying “I […]

Death Is Real – Kate Davis

Martha and Mary were right, in their accusations against Jesus. If he had been there, their brother would not have died. The author, in recording these events, goes out of his way to make sure the audience understands that Jesus intentionally stayed away from the place until Lazarus was certainly dead. Jesus knew of the […]

On Being Perfect – Kate Davis

My senior year in high school, my choir director chose a song that made many of us uncomfortable. We were a wealthy, white, suburban school, and for our state competition, he chose a slave spiritual that repeated the lyrics, “Sun up to sundown pickin that cotton, no more auction block for me.” Yeah, we were […]

Happy are the Happy

The people who are blessed — or translated better, happy, fortunate, honored — aren’t at all the ones described by Jesus’s words in our gospel reading today. The happy, the fortunate, the honored in our world aren’t poor in spirit — or poor in anything else, really. They don’t mourn, or cry, or lament. They […]